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Filtered Keywords: Treasury, Tax, GDP, Economy, Economic, Market, Trade

Feed Sources: CNBC, Wall St. Journal , Financial Times, Marginal Revolution, Liberty Street Economics

  • Crude oil gives up 12% gain, turns negative as traders await OPEC cut details
    Oil prices moved higher on Thursday as some of the world's largest producers held a meeting on oil production policy. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-04-09
  • Dow jumps 500 points, heads for biggest weekly gain since 1938
    Stocks jumped after the Federal Reserve gave more details on how it will support the economy amid the coronavirus pandemic. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-04-09
  • Federal Reserve unveils details of $2.3 trillion in programs to help support the economy
    The programs also direct expanded credit to small businesses, households and state and local governments. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-04-09
  • An oil deal is still ‘tricky,’ prices could dip into the teens if it falls apart: Strategist
    There won't be a quick rebound in prices "in any event" because of the demand destruction caused by the coronavirus crisis, said Helima Croft of RBC Capital Markets. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-04-09
  • Australia’s finance minister says he’s ‘confident’ the economy will ‘bounce back strongly’
    The comments by Australia's finance minister Mathias Cormann came after S&P Global Ratings downgraded the country's outlook to negative from stable. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-04-09
  • Bank of England to temporarily finance UK government spending
    The Bank of England has agreed temporarily to finance government borrowing in response to COVID-19 if funds cannot immediately be raised from debt markets. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-04-09
  • Coronavirus could spark a financial crisis for struggling countries, Singapore’s trade minister warns
    The economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic could cascade from a health catastrophe into a financial crisis in countries struggling to cope, Singapore's trade minister warned on Thursday. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-04-09
  • Mark Cuban has doubts about the market comeback and is raising more cash
    Billionaire entrepreneur Mark Cuban isn't convinced that the swift market rally is here to stay. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-04-08
  • African leaders seek remedies, with 20 million job losses and shrinking GDP expected
    The African Union has projected a contraction across the continent's economies and the loss of almost 20 million this year amid the fallout from the coronavirus pandemic. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-04-08
  • German economy likely shrank by record 9.8% in the second quarter due to coronavirus, institutes say
    Europe's largest economy probably shrank by 9.8% in the second quarter, its biggest decline since records began in 1970. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-04-08
  • Euro zone fails to reach a deal on new coronavirus stimulus after 16 hours of talks
    Euro zone finance ministers will meet again Thursday, after failing to agree on new stimulus for the bloc's economy. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-04-08
  • The latest investment strategy menaced by flailing markets: dividend stocks
    A pronounced economic slump sparked by the coronavirus outbreak has imperiled a popular investment strategy: buying dividend stocks. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-04-08
  • Philippines is prepared for the coronavirus outbreak to last until end-May, says finance secretary
    The Philippine government has set aside around $23 billion in funding for healthcare and economic efforts during the outbreak, said Secretary of Finance Carlos Dominguez. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-04-08
  • Australia’s parliament set to pass huge stimulus plan as S&P ratings agency lowers ‘AAA’ outlook
    Australia's coveted "AAA" rating came under a cloud on Wednesday as its parliament returned to pass an emergency A$130 billion ($80 billion) stimulus package to cushion the economic blow of the coronavirus pandemic. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-04-08
  • Asia Pacific markets mixed as countries regionally continue to battle pandemic
    Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe declared Tuesday a state of emergency to combat coronavirus infections in major population centers. Singapore also passed a set of laws that bans social gatherings of any size. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-04-07
  • What Happens When Everyone Stays Home to Eat? (Ep. 412)
    Covid-19 has shocked our food-supply system like nothing in modern history. We examine the winners, the losers, the unintended consequences — and just how much toilet paper one household really needs. Listen and subscribe to our podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or elsewhere. Below is a transcript of the episode, ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-04-08
  • Is $2 Trillion the Right Medicine for a Sick Economy? (Ep. 411)
    Congress just passed the biggest aid package in modern history. We ask six former White House economic advisors and one U.S. Senator: Will it actually work? What are its best and worst features? Where does $2 trillion come from, and what are the long-term effects of all that government spending? ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-04-01
  • What Does COVID-19 Mean for Cities (and Marriages)? (Ep. 410)
    There are a lot of upsides to urban density — but viral contagion is not one of them. Also: a nationwide lockdown will show if familiarity really breeds contempt. And: how to help your neighbor. Listen and subscribe to our podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or elsewhere. Below is a ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-03-25
  • The Side Effects of Social Distancing (Ep. 409)
    (Photo: Shutterstock) In just a few weeks, the novel coronavirus has undone a century’s worth of our economic and social habits. What consequences will this have on our future — and is there ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-03-18
  • Why Rent Control Doesn’t Work (Ep. 373 Rebroadcast)
    (Photo: Frampton) As cities become ever-more expensive, politicians and housing advocates keep calling for rent control. Economists think that’s a terrible idea. They say it helps a small (albeit noisy) group ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-03-11
  • Does Anyone Really Know What Socialism Is? (Ep. 408)
    (Photo: Flickr) Trump says it would destroy us. Sanders says it will save us. The majority of millennials would like it to replace capitalism. But what is “it”? We bring in the economists to sort things out and tell us what the U.S. can learn from the good (and bad) ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-03-04
  • Is There Really a “Loneliness Epidemic”? (Ep. 407)
    (Photo: Getty/Guang Niu) That’s what some health officials are saying, but the data aren’t so clear. We look into what’s known (and not known) about the prevalence and effects of loneliness — including the possible upsides. Listen and subscribe to our podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or elsewhere. Below ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-02-26
  • Can You Hear Me Now? (Ep. 406)
    (Photo: Getty/Wong) When he became chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Ajit Pai announced that he was going to take a “weed whacker” to Obama-era regulations. So far, he’s kept his promise, and earned the internet’s ire for reversing the agency’s position on net neutrality. Pai defends his actions and ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-02-19
  • Can You Hear Me Now? (Ep. 406)
    (Photo: Getty/Wong) When he became chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Ajit Pai announced that he was going to take a “weed whacker” to Obama-era regulations. So far, he’s kept his promise, and earned the internet’s ire for reversing the agency’s position on net neutrality. Pai defends his actions and ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-02-19
  • Policymaking Is Not a Science (Yet) (Ep. 405)
    (Photo: Piqsels) Why do so many promising solutions — in education, medicine, criminal justice, etc. — fail to scale up into great policy? And can a new breed of “implementation scientists” crack the code? Listen and subscribe to our podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or elsewhere. Below is a transcript ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-02-12
  • Policymaking Is Not a Science (Yet) (Ep. 405)
    (Photo: Piqsels) Why do so many promising solutions — in education, medicine, criminal justice, etc. — fail to scale up into great policy? And can a new breed of “implementation scientists” crack the code? Listen and subscribe to our podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or elsewhere. Below is a transcript ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-02-12
  • Does the President Matter as Much as You Think? (Ep. 404)
    (Photo: Getty/Brenner) We asked this same question nearly a decade ago. The answer then: probably not. But a lot has changed since then, and we’re three years into one of the most anomalous presidencies in American history. So once again we try to sort out presidential signal from noise. What ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-02-05
  • Does the President Matter as Much as You Think? (Ep. 404)
    (Photo: Getty/Brenner) We asked this same question nearly a decade ago. The answer then: probably not. But a lot has changed since then, and we’re three years into one of the most anomalous presidencies in American history. So once again we try to sort out presidential signal from noise. What ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-02-05
  • How the San Francisco 49ers Stopped Being Losers (Ep. 350 Update)
    (Photo Getty/Cunningham) One of the most storied (and valuable) sports franchises in the world had fallen far. So they decided to do a full reboot — and it worked: this week, they are headed back to the Super Bowl. Before the 2018 season, we sat down with the team’s owner, ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-01-29
  • How the San Francisco 49ers Stopped Being Losers (Ep. 350 Update)
    (Photo Getty/Cunningham) One of the most storied (and valuable) sports franchises in the world had fallen far. So they decided to do a full reboot — and it worked: this week, they are headed back to the Super Bowl. Before the 2018 season, we sat down with the team’s owner, ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-01-29
  • Newsletter: What Will the Recovery Look Like?
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Brought to You by the Letters U and V The coronavirus pandemic will cause a severe economic contraction, 14.4 million job losses and a spike in the unemployment rate this ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-04-09
  • Newsletter: How Do You Reopen a $22 Trillion Economy?
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Back to Life Government officials and business leaders are turning their attention to a looming challenge: Reopening a $22 trillion U.S. economy. With some preliminary signs that infections from the ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-04-08
  • Newsletter: Crisis of Confidence
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Crisis of Confidence Small-business confidence plunged in March. The National Federation of Independent Business small-business optimism index posted its largest decline in the monthly survey’s three-decade history. “Small business owners’ ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-04-07
  • Newsletter: Shutting the Economy, Slowing the Pandemic
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. The number of confirmed coronavirus cases around the world surged past 1.2 million but markets rose early Monday following fresh signals that lockdowns in the U.S. and Europe were helping ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-04-06
  • Newsletter: Labor-Market Collapse, Service-Sector Shutdown
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Confirmed cases of coronavirus surpassed 1 million world-wide and governments are making longer-term plans for life under the pandemic. Jeff Sparshott here with the latest on the economic fallout. Collapse ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-04-03
  • Newsletter: Millions More Unemployed
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. U.S. jobless claims will offer a timely snapshot of the labor market this morning. Jeff Sparshott here with a quick preview and the latest from around the global economy. Unemployment ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-04-02
  • Newsletter: ‘Hell of a Bad Two Weeks’
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. In the U.S. and much of the West, the health and economic toll from the coronavirus is expected to get worse before it gets better. Jeff Sparshott here to take ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-04-01
  • Newsletter: China Bounces but Isn’t Back
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Don’t Call it a Comeback An official gauge of China’s manufacturing activity rebounded strongly in March as work resumption picked up, though economists warned that business remains far from normal ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-03-31
  • Newsletter: Fastest Reallocation of Labor Since World War II
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Going Mobile The coronavirus pandemic is forcing the fastest reallocation of labor since World War II, with companies and governments mobilizing an army of idled workers into new, urgently needed ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-03-30
  • Newsletter: ‘We May Well Be in a Recession’
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Record High A record 3.28 million workers applied for unemployment benefits last week as the new coronavirus hit the U.S. economy, marking an abrupt end to the nation’s historic, decadelong ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-03-27
  • Newsletter: The American Jobs Machine Has Shut Down
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Keep an eye on the weekly U.S. jobless claims report out today to gauge how quickly and deeply the coronavirus pandemic is crashing into the economy. Jeff Sparshott here with ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-03-26
  • Newsletter: We Have a Deal
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Global stocks rallied Wednesday as investors cheered an agreement between U.S. lawmakers and the Trump administration on an estimated $2 trillion stimulus package to limit the economic damage of the coronavirus pandemic. ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-03-25
  • Newsletter: Service-Sector Struggles
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Crash Economic activity is crashing around the globe. IHS Markit’s surveys of purchasing managers in Japan and Europe show overall activity plummeting in March, led by a service-sector collapse as ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-03-24
  • Newsletter: Lost Jobs, Damaged Economy
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Contraction The fallout from the coronavirus outbreak is expected to have a significant negative impact on U.S. economic prospects, with predictions emerging for losses of millions of jobs this year ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-03-23
  • Newsletter: Brace for a Surge in Layoffs
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Layoffs Surging The number of Americans applying for first-time unemployment benefits jumped last week. The worst is yet to come. Initial jobless claims increased by 70,000 in the week ended Saturday, March ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-03-20
  • Thursday assorted links
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-04-09
  • Wednesday assorted links
    1. Air pollution is very bad for Covid-19 deaths (NYT).  Worse than had been thought. 2. U.S. vs. Europe. 3. Using mobility data to predict the growth of Covid-19 cases. 4. Allcott, Boxell, Conway, Gentzkow, Thaler, and Yang: “We then present new survey evidence of significant gaps between Republicans and ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-04-08
  • Safety Protocols for Getting Back to Work
    China bent the curve, Italy bent the curve and I believe that the curve is bending in the United States. Suppression is working and the second part of the strategy of test, trace and isolate will start to come into play in a few weeks. The states are gearing up ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-04-08
  • Do better incentives limit cognitive biases?
    There is a new paper by Benjamin Enke, Uri Gneezy, Brian Hall, David Martin, Vadim Nelidov, Theo Offerman, and Jeroen van de Ven: Despite decades of research on heuristics and biases, empirical evidence on the effect of large incentives – as present in relevant economic decisions – on cognitive biases ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-04-08
  • *Markets, Minds, and Money: Why America Leads the World in University Research*
    One of the best books on the history of American higher education, author Miguel Urquiola of Columbia argues for the importance of market competition in the rise and dominance of the American system.  Strongly argued and full of good evidence and stories, here is one excerpt I found of interest: ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-04-08
  • Macroeconomic Implications of COVID-19: Can Negative Supply Shocks Cause Demand Shortages?
    There is a new NBER paper by Veronica GuerrieriGuido LorenzoniLudwig StraubIván Werning: We present a theory of Keynesian supply shocks: supply shocks that trigger changes in aggregate demand larger than the shocks themselves. We argue that the economic shocks associated to the COVID-19 epidemic—shutdowns, layoffs, and firm exits—may have this feature. ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-04-07
  • Tuesday assorted links
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-04-07
  • *Islam, Authoritarianism, and Underdevelopment*
    That is a recent book by Ahmet T. Kuru, published in August.  All books should have a (non-Amazon) abstract, and here it is for this book: Why do Muslim-majority countries exhibit high levels of authoritarianism and low levels of socioeconomic development in comparison to world averages? Ahmet T. Kuru criticizes ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-04-07
  • Crisis Innovation
    That is the title of a new working paper by Tania Babina, Asaf Bernstein, and Filippo Mezzanotti, here is the abstract: The effect of financial crises on innovative activity is an unsettled and important question for economic growth, but one difficult to answer with modern data. Using a differences-in-differences ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-04-07
  • Peter Navarro and the epistemic problem
    A top White House adviser starkly warned Trump administration officials in late January that the coronavirus crisis could cost the United States trillions of dollars and put millions of Americans at risk of illness or death. The warning, written in a memo by Peter Navarro, President Trump’s trade adviser, ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-04-06
  • How does isolation change status-seeking?
    That is the topic of my new Bloomberg column, excerpt: The plunge in status-seeking behavior is yet another way in which the lockdown is a remarkable and scary social experiment. One possible consequence is that many people won’t work as much, simply because no one is watching very closely and ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-04-06
  • Monday assorted links
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-04-06
  • The Economic Consequences of the Virus?
    The inhabitant of New York could order by computer, sipping his morning coffee in bed, the various products of the whole earth, in such quantity as he might see fit, and reasonably expect their early delivery upon his doorstep; he could at the same moment and by the same means ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-04-06
  • Our regulatory state is failing us, installment #1437
    The Trump administration has stumbled in its initial push to implement the $2 trillion coronavirus aid package, with confusion and fear mounting among small businesses, workers and the newly unemployed since the bill was signed into law late last month. Small-business owners have reported delays ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-04-06
  • Why I do not favor variolation for Covid-19
    Robin Hanson makes the strongest case for variolation, here is one excerpt: So the scenario is this: Hero Hotels welcome sufficiently young and healthy volunteers. Friends and family can enter together, and remain together. A cohort enters together, and is briefly isolated individually for as long as it takes to ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-04-06
  • How Does Supervision Affect Bank Performance during Downturns?
    Uyanga Byambaa, Beverly Hirtle, Anna Kovner, and Matthew Plosser Supervision and regulation are critical tools for the promotion of stability and soundness in the financial sector. In a prior post, we discussed findings from our recent research paper which examines the impact of supervision on bank performance ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-04-08
  • Coronavirus Outbreak Sends Consumer Expectations Plummeting
    Olivier Armantier, Gizem Koşar, Rachel Pomerantz, Daphne Skandalis, Kyle Smith, Giorgio Topa, and Wilbert van der Klaauw The New York Fed’s Center for Microeconomic Data released results today from its March 2020 Survey of Consumer Expectations (SCE), which provides information on consumers' economic expectations and behavior. In particular, the ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-04-06
  • How the Fed Managed the Treasury Yield Curve in the 1940s
    Kenneth D. Garbade The coronavirus pandemic has prompted the Federal Reserve to pledge to purchase Treasury securities and agency mortgage-backed securities in the amount needed to support the smooth market functioning and effective transmission of monetary policy to the economy. But some market participants have questioned whether something ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-04-06
  • The Value of Opacity in a Banking Crisis
    Haelim Anderson and Adam Copeland During moments of heightened economic uncertainty, authorities often need to decide on how much information to disclose. For example, during crisis periods, we often observe regulators limiting access to bank‑level information with the goal of restoring the public's confidence in banks. Thus, information ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-04-02
  • Monitoring Real Activity in Real Time: The Weekly Economic Index
    Daniel Lewis, Karel Mertens, and Jim Stock Economists are well-practiced at assessing real activity based on familiar aggregate time series, like the unemployment rate, industrial production, or GDP growth. However, these series represent monthly or quarterly averages of economic conditions, and are only available at a considerable lag, ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-03-30
  • Businesses in the Tri-State Region Struggling to Weather the Coronavirus Outbreak
    Jaison R. Abel, Jason Bram, and Richard Deitz As a result of the coronavirus outbreak, New York State, New Jersey, and Connecticut have closed nonessential businesses and schools and asked residents to stay home in an effort to slow the spread of the virus. These actions are unprecedented, ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-03-30
  • Fight the Pandemic, Save the Economy: Lessons from the 1918 Flu
    Sergio Correia, Stephan Luck, and Emil Verner The COVID-19 outbreak has sparked urgent questions about the impact of pandemics, and associated countermeasures, on the real economy. Policymakers are in uncharted territory, with little guidance on what the expected economic fallout will be and how the crisis should ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-03-27
  • How Does Credit Access Affect Job-Search Outcomes and Sorting?
    Kyle Herkenhoff and Gordon Phillips How does access to consumer credit affect the job finding behavior of displaced workers? Are these workers looking for jobs at larger and more productive firms? What is the impact of consumer credit on the amount of time it takes to find a ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-03-04
  • Searching for Higher Job Satisfaction
    Gizem Kosar, Leo Goldman, and Kyle Smith Job-to-job transitions—those job moves that occur without an intervening spell of unemployment—have been discussed in the literature as a driver of wage growth. Economists typically describe the labor market as a “job ladder” that workers climb by moving to jobs with ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-03-04
  • Is the Tide Lifting All Boats? A Closer Look at the Earnings Growth Experiences of U.S. Workers
    René Chalom, Fatih Karahan, Brendan Moore, and Giorgio Topa The growth rate of hourly earnings is a widely used indicator to assess the economic progress of U.S. workers, as well as the health of the labor market. It is also a measure of wage pressures that could potentially ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-03-04
  • Women Have Been Hit Hard by the Loss of Routine Jobs, Too
    Jaison R. Abel and Richard Deitz Technological change and globalization have caused a massive transformation in the U.S. economy. While creating new opportunities for many workers, these forces have eliminated millions of good-paying jobs, particularly routine jobs in the manufacturing sector. Indeed, a great deal ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-03-04
  • Introduction to Heterogeneity Series II: Labor Market Outcomes
    Rajashri Chakrabarti While average outcomes serve as important yardsticks for how the economy is doing, understanding heterogeneity—how outcomes vary across a population—is key to understanding both the whole picture and the implications of any given policy. Following our six-part look at heterogeneity in October 2019, we now turn ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-03-03
  • Did Subprime Borrowers Drive the Housing Boom?
    James Conklin, W. Scott Frame, Kristopher Gerardi, and Haoyang Liu The role of subprime mortgage lending in the U.S. housing boom of the 2000s is hotly debated in academic literature. One prevailing narrative ascribes the unprecedented home price growth during the mid-2000s to an expansion in mortgage lending to ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-02-26
  • Understanding Heterogeneous Agent New Keynesian Models: Insights from a PRANK
    Sushant Acharya and Keshav Dogra In recent years there has been a lot of interest in the effect of income inequality (heterogeneity) on the economy, from both academics and policymakers. Researchers have developed Heterogeneous Agent New Keynesian (HANK) models that incorporate heterogeneity and uninsurable idiosyncratic risk into the New ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-02-24
  • At the New York Fed: Fourteenth Annual Joint Conference with NYU-Stern on Financial Intermediation
    Kristian Blickle, Anna Kovner, and Shivram Viswanathan An understanding of the developments in financial intermediation is critical to the efforts of the New York Fed to promote financial stability and economic growth. In line with this mission, the Bank recently hosted the fourteenth annual Federal Reserve Bank of ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-02-19