Economy Feed

Filtered Keywords: Treasury, Tax, GDP, Economy, Economic, Market, Trade

Feed Sources: CNBC, Wall St. Journal , Financial Times, Marginal Revolution, Liberty Street Economics

  • Talk about trade-war progress moves the market — even when there is no progress
    The stock market has moved on virtually every U.S.-China trade headline for nearly two years. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2019-11-15
  • China bought most of Greece’s main port and now it wants to make it the biggest in Europe
    China is looking to transform Greece's Piraeus port into the biggest harbour in Europe — making it the most crucial transit hub for trade between Asia and Europe. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2019-11-15
  • Airbus is eyeing the secondhand market as it continues to promote the A380
    Airbus will stop building its A380 superjumbo in 2021 but it sees benefits to a secondhand market. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2019-11-15
  • China’s central bank injects 200 billion yuan to boost liquidity, keeps rate unchanged
    Several traders said the cash injection was likely a response to tighter liquidity in the interbank market from late Thursday, which pushed up borrowing costs. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2019-11-14
  • Asia stocks mixed amid US-China trade uncertainty
    Asia markets were mixed in Friday morning trade following a record close overnight on Wall Street for the S&P 500. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2019-11-14
  • Nancy Pelosi says a USMCA trade deal breakthrough could be ‘imminent’
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi indicated progress toward a final agreement on President Donald Trump's North American trade deal replacement. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2019-11-14
  • Cisco CEO warns big customers are cautious due to US-China trade and Brexit uncertainty
    "They're just expressing caution that they're concerned about what's going on in the macro environment," says Cisco's Chuck Robbins. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2019-11-14
  • Credit Suisse says Tesla is running out of time as the major electric car maker – shares to dive 40%
    Credit Suisse on Thursday noted that Tesla has nearly an 80% share of the U.S. market for electric vehicles. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2019-11-14
  • OPEC sees smaller 2020 oil surplus ahead of policy meeting
    OPEC has pointed to a smaller surplus in the oil market next year, although it still expects demand for its crude to drop. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2019-11-14
  • China says the trade war should be ended by removing tariffs
    China is still calling for the U.S. to roll back tariffs as part of any "phase one" agreement. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2019-11-14
  • Germany narrowly avoids a technical recession with 0.1% growth in the third quarter
    Germany has narrowly avoided a technical recession, after the latest figures showed the country's economy grew by 0.1% in the third quarter. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2019-11-14
  • Chinese yuan could strengthen to 6.90 per US dollar if ‘phase one’ deal is signed, says economist
    Dariusz Kowalczyk, chief China economist at Credit Agricole, said there's an 80% chance the U.S. and China will sign a "phase one" trade deal. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2019-11-14
  • Hong Kong is still ‘a very good proxy’ for Chinese assets despite the unrest, says an economist
    Hong Kong is still a "very good proxy" for foreign investors wanting to access the Chinese markets, an economist from Natixis says. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2019-11-13
  • US-China trade talks are getting held up because of disagreements on a number of issues
    The U.S. is trying to secure stronger concessions from China in exchange for rolling back some of the tariffs. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2019-11-13
  • A global economic recovery is coming — but ‘much later’ than people think, UBS says
    Switzerland's largest bank has warned that a global economic recovery will take much longer to occur than many investors expect. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2019-11-13
  • How to Save $32 Million in One Hour (Ep. 397)
    The U.K. has been at the epicenter of evidence-based policymaking, where the Behavioral Insights Team — or “Nudge Unit” — has done research and advised governments and institutions on how to put behavioral science to use for the greater good. (Photo: Wilson/Getty) For nearly a decade, governments have been using ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2019-11-13
  • Why Does Tipping Still Exist? (Ep. 396)
    It’s estimated that tipping in America adds up to about $40 billion a year. That is larger than the entire health-and-fitness industry and it’s double the annual budget for NASA. (Photo: Circe Denyer) It’s an acutely haphazard way of paying workers, and yet it keeps expanding. We dig into the ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2019-11-06
  • Speak Softly and Carry Big Data (Ep. 395)
    Assumptions interfere with good foreign policy, says political scientist Robert Pape. “It’s too easy to have preconceptions like it’s religion that causes people to blow themselves up. And if you get it wrong you could do really dumb things, like send an army to Iraq in 2003.” (Photo: Nelson/Getty) Do ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2019-10-30
  • Does Hollywood Still Have a Princess Problem? (Ep. 394)
    Disney’s classic princess movies, which some critics see as promoting outdated role models, are being updated to reflect more modern sensibilities. And the strategy is paying off. (Photo: Harrison/Getty) For decades, there’s been a huge gender disparity both on-screen and behind the scenes. But it seems like cold, hard data ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2019-10-23
  • Can Britain Get Its “Great” Back? (Ep. 393)
    London retains just seven percent of taxes raised, compared to cities like New York (50 percent) and Tokyo (70 percent). Mayor Sadiq Khan says the city should have a larger say in how this revenue is used. (Photo: Taylor/Getty) It used to be a global capital of innovation, invention, and ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2019-10-16
  • The Prime Minister Who Cried Brexit (Ep. 392)
    David Cameron and his Conservative administration became synonymous with Brexit, but he points out that every other political party in the U.K. has in recent history “supported a referendum on Europe.” (Photo: Kitwood/Getty) In 2016, David Cameron held a referendum on whether the U.K. should stay in the European Union. ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2019-10-09
  • America’s Math Curriculum Doesn’t Add Up (Ep. 391)
    The high-school math curriculum in the U.S. predates the age of modern computers. Can educators and policymakers be convinced it’s time for an overhaul? (Photo: Needpix) Most high-school math classes are still preparing students for the Sputnik era. Steve Levitt wants to get rid of the “geometry sandwich” and instead ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2019-10-02
  • Fed Up (Ep. 390)
    As president of the largest of the Fed’s 12 branches, Mary Daly relies on economic data — and on the stories of people she interviews for her podcast — to help set policy. (Photo: Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco) Mary Daly rose from high-school dropout to president of the ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2019-09-25
  • Yes, the Open Office Is Terrible — But It Doesn’t Have to Be (Ep. 358 Rebroadcast)
    Feeling stressed from working in a noisy open office? Tell your boss that working from home increases worker productivity by 13 percent! (Photo: MaxPixel) It began as a post-war dream for a more collaborative and egalitarian workplace. It has evolved into a nightmare of noise and discomfort. Can the ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2019-09-11
  • The Economics of Sports Gambling (Ep. 388)
    Today, roughly 60 million people in the U.S. and Canada play fantasy sports, resulting in revenues of around $8 billion a year in the U.S. alone. (Photo: Miller/Getty) What happens when tens of millions of fantasy-sports players are suddenly able to bet real money on real games? We’re about to ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2019-09-04
  • The Future of Meat (Ep. 367 Rebroadcast)
    Meat production has become more efficient. But turning animals into food still requires an enormous amount of resources. Can scientists build a better burger from scratch? (Photo: Scott Olson/Getty) Global demand for beef, chicken, and pork continues to rise. So do concerns about environmental and other costs. Will reconciling these ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2019-08-28
  • Should America Be Run by … Trader Joe’s? (Ep. 359 Rebroadcast)
    The typical supermarket stocks roughly 35,000 items. Trader Joe’s averages just 3,000. Are they proof that less is more? (Photo: Michael Nagle/Getty Images) The quirky little grocery chain with California roots and German ownership has a lot to teach all of us about choice architecture, efficiency, frugality, collaboration, and team ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2019-08-21
  • Hello, My Name Is Marijuana Pepsi! (Ep. 387)
    Marijuana Pepsi Vandyck was a failing student at age 15. Thirty-one years later she earned her Ph.D., analyzing the impact of distinctively black names on students’ classroom experiences. (Photo: University of Wisconsin-Whitewater) Research shows that having a distinctively black name doesn’t affect your economic future. But what is the day-to-day ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2019-08-14
  • How Much Does Your Name Matter? (Ep. 122 Rebroadcast)
    A liberal mother is about 50 percent more likely to give her girl an uncommon or unique name than a conservative mother, and about 40 percent more likely to give her boy one. (Photo: Wise/Wikimedia Commons) A kid’s name can tell us something about his parents — their race, social ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2019-08-07
  • How the Supermarket Helped America Win the Cold War (Ep. 386)
    After World War II, the share of food bought in supermarkets soared in the U.S. — from 28 percent in 1946 to 70 percent by 1963. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons) Aisle upon aisle of fresh produce, cheap meat, and sugary cereal — a delicious embodiment of free-market capitalism, right? Not quite. ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2019-07-31
  • Newsletter: Why Aren’t More Americans Claiming Jobless Benefits?
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Good morning. Jeff Sparshott here to take you through the latest on the labor market, consumer spending, trade, the Fed and bond markets. Send us your questions, comments and suggestions ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2019-11-15
  • Newsletter: Global Growth Looks Soft, Another Snag in Trade Talks
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Good morning. Jeff Sparshott here to take you through key developments in the global economy. You can send us your questions, comments and suggestions by replying to this email. Two, ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2019-11-14
  • Newsletter: It’s Not the Economy Anymore, Stupid
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Good morning. Jeff Sparshott here to take you through key developments in the global economy. Please send us your questions, comments and suggestions by replying to this email. Logjam Tariffs ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2019-11-13
  • Newsletter: Paying for Tariffs, Waiting on Oil Prices
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. President Trump gives a much-anticipated speech at the Economic Club of New York today. Investors, observers and trade partners will be watching closely for clues on a U.S.-China trade deal ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2019-11-12
  • Newsletter: Piling Up Debt
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. This should be a big week for economic news, marked by President Trump’s speech at the Economic Club of New York on Tuesday, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell’s appearance on Capitol Hill ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2019-11-11
  • Newsletter: Not Enough Workers or Not Enough Jobs?
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Economists debate the cause of a hiring slowdown, it’s still not entirely clear what a U.S.-China phase one deal would look like, the Fed is putting a price on climate ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2019-11-08
  • Newsletter: Is the Trade War Ending?
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. China says Beijing and Washington have agreed to roll back tariffs, U.S. productivity is sputtering, and cleaner air in China might be good news for joggers but could signal weakness ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2019-11-07
  • Newsletter: Is This What a Soft Landing Feels Like?
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Imports are down, there are fewer job openings, there are mixed signals on the health of the service sector and energy companies are cutting back on investment. A slowdown? Sure. ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2019-11-06
  • Newsletter: Trade Progress, a Price on Good Health, Investors Really Like the U.S. Economy
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. The U.S. and China are working toward a partial trade deal, a year of healthy living has a price tag, investors think the U.S. economy is pretty darn good, China ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2019-11-05
  • Newsletter: How Would We Know if a Recession Started?
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Homeowners are staying put, robots are—slowly—getting smarter, and Europe’s factories are mired in their worst slump in seven years. And we’ve got a lot more to start the week… Are ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2019-11-04
  • Newsletter Special Edition: Labor Market Shrugs Off Strike, Uncertainty
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. U.S. employers hired at a solid clip in October, showing the job market remains strong even in the face of labor strikes and trade disputes. The economy added 128,000 jobs in October. ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2019-11-01
  • Newsletter: Jobs, Consumers and Wages
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. It’s jobs day! Economists are forecasting a net gain of 75,000 for U.S. payrolls in October and a slight bump in the unemployment rate to 3.6%. Wildcards: The United Auto ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2019-11-01
  • Newsletter: Fed Signals Pause, Hong Kong in Recession
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. The WSJ has relaunched its calendar of key economic events. The new format works across multiple platforms, including Outlook, Google and Apple. Our old pilot-project calendar will be discontinued and ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2019-10-31
  • Parsing the Fed: How the October Statement Changed From September
    The Federal Reserve releases a statement at the conclusion of each of its policy-setting meetings, outlining the central bank’s economic outlook and the actions it plans to take. Much of the statement remains the same from meeting to meeting. Fed watchers closely parse changes between statements to see how the ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2019-10-30
  • Newsletter: GDP Grows but Slows
    The Federal Reserve gets one final sweeping view of the economy before its interest-rate decision this afternoon. U.S. economic growth settled in at a lower gear in the third quarter, with growth in consumer spending and housing investment offsetting a drop in business investment. Gross domestic product—the value of all goods ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2019-10-30
  • Just Released: Racial Disparities in Student Loan Outcomes
    Andrew F. Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, Joelle Scally, and Wilbert van der Klaauw Total household debt balances increased by $92 billion in the third quarter of 2019, according to the latest Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit from the New York Fed’s Center for Microeconomic Data. The balance increase reflected nearly ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2019-11-13
  • The Side Effects of Shadow Banking on Liquidity Provision
    Teodora Paligorova and João A.C. Santos Correction: When this post was first published, line labels in the panel showing Tier 1 capital ratios were reversed; the labels have been corrected. (November 13, 10:40 a.m.) Over the past two decades, the growth of shadow banking has transformed the ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2019-11-13
  • At the New York Fed: Fifth Annual Conference on the U.S. Treasury Market
    Michael J. Fleming, Peter Johansson, Frank M. Keane, and Justin Meyer The New York Fed recently hosted the fifth annual Conference on the U.S. Treasury Market. The one-day event was co-sponsored with the U.S. Department of the Treasury, the Federal Reserve Board, the U.S. Securities and Exchange ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2019-11-08
  • Trade Policy Uncertainty May Affect the Organization of Firms’ Supply Chains
    Sebastian Heise, Justin R. Pierce, Georg Schaur, and Peter K. Schott Global trade policy uncertainty has increased significantly, largely because of a changing tariff regime between the United States and China. In this blog post, we argue that trade policy can have a significant effect on firms’ organization ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2019-11-06
  • Since the Financial Crisis, Aggregate Payments Have Co-moved with Aggregate Reserves. Why?
    Thomas Eisenbach, Kyra Frye, and Helene Hall Fedwire Funds, a key payment system in the United States, is used by banks to wire money to one another throughout the day. Historically, the total value of payments sent over Fedwire has been roughly proportional to economic activity. Since the financial ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2019-11-04
  • Just Released: Introducing the SCE Public Policy Survey
    Gizem Kosar, Kyle Smith, and Wilbert van der Klaauw Today, we are releasing new data on individuals’ expectations for future changes in a wide range of public policies. These data have been collected every four months since November 2015 as part of our Survey of Consumer Expectations (SCE). ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2019-10-17
  • Optimists and Pessimists in the Housing Market
    Haoyang Liu and Christopher Palmer Given momentum in house prices over business cycles, research on consumer beliefs since the financial crisis has honed in on the potential importance of extrapolative beliefs—myopically assuming trends in asset prices will continue. Extrapolation is frequently cited as a central reason for excessively ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2019-10-16
  • Does U.S. Health Inequality Reflect Income Inequality—or Something Else?
    Maxim Pinkovskiy Health is an integral part of well-being. The United Nations Human Development Index uses life expectancy (together with GDP per capita and literacy) as one of three key indicators of human welfare across the world. In this post, I discuss the state of life expectancy inequality ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2019-10-15
  • From the Vault: A Look Back at the October 15, 2014, Flash Rally
    Michael J. Fleming, Peter Johansson, Frank M. Keane, and Justin Meyer Five years ago today, U.S. Treasury yields plunged and then quickly rebounded for no apparent reason amid high volatility, strained liquidity conditions, and record trading volume in the market. Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell, then a Board ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2019-10-15
  • Is Free College the Solution to Student Debt Woes? Studying the Heterogeneous Impacts of Merit Aid Programs
    Rajashri Chakrabarti, William Nober, and Wilbert van der Klaauw The rising cost of a college education has become an important topic of discussion among both policymakers and practitioners. At least eleven states have recently introduced programs to make public two-year education tuition free, including New York, which is ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2019-10-10
  • Who Borrows for College—and Who Repays?
    Andrew F. Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, Joelle Scally, and Wilbert van der Klaauw Student loans are increasingly a focus of discourse among politicians, policymakers, and the news media, resulting in a range of new ideas to address the swelling aggregate debt. Evaluating student loan policy proposals requires understanding the challenges faced by ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2019-10-09
  • Job Ladders and Careers
    Fatih Karahan, Brendan Moore, and Serdar Ozkan Workers in the United States experience vast differences in lifetime earnings. Individuals in the 90th percentile earn around seven times more than those in the 10th percentile, and those in the top percentile earn almost twenty times more. A large share ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2019-10-08
  • Some Places Are Much More Unequal than Others
    Jaison R. Abel and Richard Deitz Economic inequality in the United States is much more pronounced in some parts of the country than others. In this post, we examine the geography of wage inequality, drawing on our recent Economic Policy Review article. We find that the most unequal ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2019-10-07
  • Introduction to Heterogeneity Series: Understanding Causes and Implications of Various Inequalities
    Rajashri Chakrabarti and William Nober Economic analysis is often geared toward understanding the average effects of a given policy or program. Likewise, economic policies frequently target the average person or firm. While averages are undoubtedly useful reference points for researchers and policymakers, they don’t tell the whole story: ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2019-10-07
  • U.S. Virgin Islands Struggle While Puerto Rico Rebounds
    Jason Bram Two years after hurricanes Irma and Maria wreaked havoc on Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, the two territories’ economies have moved in very different directions. When the hurricanes struck, both were already in long economic slumps and had significant fiscal problems. As of ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2019-10-02