Economy Feed

Filtered Keywords: Treasury, Tax, GDP, Economy, Economic, Market, Trade

Feed Sources: CNBC, Wall St. Journal , Financial Times, Marginal Revolution, Liberty Street Economics

  • Nasdaq stocks led by Tesla continue their blistering run while chill envelops rest of the market
    It's tough to deny that big chunks of the Nasdaq are in the sway of overheated speculation. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-07-11
  • Real-time data is showing that the coronavirus is causing ‘widespread’ economic damage
    Surging coronavirus cases are showing up in both a slowdown of current economic activity as well as future plans, according to real-time data tracking things like job listings, dining out and vacations. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-07-10
  • Big Tech went from growth stocks to Wall Street’s Treasury bond substitute during the coronavirus
    Wall Street flocked into these names because they believe their business models can not only weather this downturn, but thrive in it. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-07-10
  • Market heads into worst earnings season in 12 years amid worries virus is slowing recovery
    The worst earnings season in years is about to begin, and stocks could shrug off sharp profit declines, if companies see signs of recovery. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-07-10
  • Trump says U.S.-China relationship is ‘severely damaged,’ phase 2 trade deal not a priority
    Trump blamed China for not stopping the spread of the coronavirus, according to reporters who were traveling with the president on Air Force One. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-07-10
  • Stocks open flat as investors weigh spike in coronavirus cases, treatment news
    Stocks opened along the flatline on Friday as traders weighed positive news about a potential coronavirus treatment and another record spike in virus cases. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-07-10
  • Goldman Sachs picks 20 stocks to ride Europe’s push toward a greener future
    The European Union's landmark plan to become climate-neutral by 2050 promises to overhaul the bloc's economy, and 20 regional companies are well placed to capitalize on these changes, according to Goldman Sachs. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-07-10
  • ‘Vaccine nationalism’ could lead to the coronavirus devastating public health and the economy, experts warn
    Analysts have predicted that a battle for access to an effective vaccine could stretch into 2021 or 2022. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-07-10
  • Supreme Court says Manhattan DA can get Trump’s tax records, but rejects bid by House Democrats
    The Supreme Court on Thursday delivered split opinions in two cases over whether President Donald Trump can shield his tax records from investigators, handing a win to the Manhattan district attorney but rejecting parallel efforts by Democrats in the House of Representatives. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-07-09
  • Nasdaq hits record high as tech shares rise again, but Walgreens leads Dow lower
    Stocks rose slightly on Thursday as major tech shares continue to lead the market higher amid rising coronavirus cases. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-07-09
  • A ‘financial war’ with China could be brewing on top of the trade war
    U.S. regulators have long sought more transparency from Chinese companies with shares trading on U.S. exchanges. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-07-09
  • Stocks are up, but so is gold — and analysts say the metal’s rally is just getting started
    Gold is traditionally used as a hedge against inflation and prices typically move higher as economic conditions deteriorate. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-07-09
  • In race to bring vaccine to market, big pharma struggles to protect its intellectual property rights
    The World Health Organization this week said 21 candidate vaccines are in clinical trials at the moment, meaning they are being tested on human volunteers. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-07-09
  • The Chinese yuan is still far from becoming a ‘safe-haven’ alternative to the U.S. dollar, Citi says
    Don't expect the Chinese yuan to become a "safe-haven" alternative to the dollar or U.S. Treasurys anytime soon, says Ebrahim Rahbari of Citi. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-07-09
  • WTO to select new leader at a time of crisis — here’s who’s on the list
    The change at the helm of the WTO comes at a time when many question the future of the organization as an advocate for international trade. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2020-07-09
  • Remembrance of Economic Crises Past (Ep. 425)
    Christina Romer was a top White House economist during the Great Recession. As a researcher, she specializes in the Great Depression. She tells us what those disasters can (and can’t) teach us about the Covid crash. Listen and subscribe to our podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or elsewhere. Below is ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-07-08
  • Wouldn’t It Be Better to Hear Your Eulogy Before You’re Dead? (Ep. 9)
    Also: how does a comedian cope with tragedy? With Eugene Mirman. *      *      * Relevant References & Research Question #1: Should we have funerals before people die? Stephen refers to a living-funeral scene in the book Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom. This was the living ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-07-05
  • How to Make Your Own Luck (Ep. 424)
    Before she decided to become a poker pro, Maria Konnikova didn’t know how many cards are in a deck. But she did have a Ph.D. in psychology, a brilliant coach, and a burning desire to know whether life is driven more by skill or chance. She found some answers in ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-07-01
  • The Doctor Will Zoom You Now (Ep. 423)
    Thanks to the pandemic, the telehealth revolution we’ve been promised for decades has finally arrived. Will it stick? Will it cut costs — and improve outcomes? We ring up two doctors and, of course, an economist to find out. Listen and subscribe to our podcast at Apple PodcastsStitcher, or elsewhere. Below is ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-06-24
  • Is Incompetence a Form of Dishonesty? (NSQ Ep. 6)
    Also: should we all have personal mission statements? *      *      * Relevant References & Research Question #1: Is it immoral to slack off at work when others are depending on you to do a good job? Stephen says that he values workers who “really, really, really ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-06-21
  • Introducing “No Stupid Questions” (Ep. 422)
    In this new addition to the Freakonomics Radio Network, co-hosts Stephen Dubner and Angela Duckworth discuss the relationship between age and happiness. Also: does all creativity come from pain? New episodes of No Stupid Questions are released every Sunday evening. Listen and subscribe to No Stupid Questions at Apple Podcasts, ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-06-17
  • What Do Tom Sawyer and the Founder of Duolingo Have in Common? (NSQ Ep. 5)
    Also: is there such a thing as too much science? With special guest Luis von Ahn. *      *      * Relevant References & Research Question 1: What do Luis von Ahn and Tom Sawyer have in common? Our guest on this episode is Luis von Ahn, the ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-06-14
  • How to Prevent Another Great Depression (Ep. 421)
    Millions and millions are out of work, with some jobs never coming back. We speak with four economists — and one former presidential candidate — about the best policy options and the lessons (good and bad) from the past. Listen and subscribe to our podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-06-10
  • Which Jobs Will Come Back, and When? (Ep. 420)
    Covid-19 is the biggest job killer in a century. As the lockdown eases, what does re-employment look like? Who will be first and who last? Which sectors will surge and which will disappear? Welcome to the Great Labor Reallocation of 2020. Listen and subscribe to our podcast at Apple Podcasts, ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-06-03
  • What Will College Look Like in the Fall (and Beyond)? (Ep. 418)
    Three university presidents try to answer our listeners’ questions. The result? Not much pomp and a whole lot of circumstance. Listen and subscribe to our podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or elsewhere. Below is a transcript of the episode, edited for readability. For more information on the people and ideas ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-05-13
  • Reasons to Be Cheerful (Ep. 417)
    Humans have a built-in “negativity bias,” which means we give bad news much more power than good. Would the Covid-19 crisis be an opportune time to reverse this tendency? Listen and subscribe to our podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or elsewhere. Below is a transcript of the episode, edited for ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-05-06
  • How Do You Reopen a Country? (Ep. 416)
    We speak with a governor, a former C.D.C. director, a pandemic forecaster, a hard-charging pharmacist, and a pair of economists — who say it’s all about the incentives. (Pandemillions, anyone?) Listen and subscribe to our podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or elsewhere. Below is a transcript of the episode, edited ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-04-29
  • How Rahm Emanuel Would Run the World (Ep. 415)
    As a former top adviser to presidents Clinton and Obama, he believes in the power of the federal government. But as former mayor of Chicago, he says that cities are where real problems get solved — especially in the era of Covid-19. Listen and subscribe to our podcast at Apple ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-04-26
  • Will Covid-19 Spark a Cold War (or Worse) With China? (Ep. 414)
    The U.S. spent the past few decades waiting for China to act like the global citizen it said it wanted to be. The waiting may be over. Listen and subscribe to our podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or elsewhere. Below is a transcript of the episode, edited for readability. For ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-04-22
  • Who Gets the Ventilator? (Ep. 413)
    Should a nurse or doctor who gets sick treating Covid-19 patients have priority access to a potentially life-saving healthcare device? Americans aren’t used to rationing in medicine, but it’s time to think about it. We consult a lung specialist, a bioethicist, and (of course) an economist. Listen and subscribe to ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-04-15
  • Newsletter: Growth Hinges on Containing Covid-19
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Containment Policy A strong economic recovery depends on effective and sustained containment of Covid-19, economists said in a new Wall Street Journal survey. More than 90% of business and academic ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-07-10
  • Newsletter: The Recovery Is Losing Momentum
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Slow Ride The nation’s fledgling economic recovery is losing momentum, as a new wave of coronavirus infections causes businesses to scale back or reshutter in several big states and consumers ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-07-09
  • Newsletter: Can America Get Back to Work if Schools Stay Closed?
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Think Globally, Act Locally State and local governments from Georgia to California are cutting money for schools, universities and other services as the coronavirus-induced recession wreaks havoc on their finances. ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-07-08
  • Newsletter: Two Steps Forward…
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Looking Up U.S. services industries showed signs of recovery in June as businesses took early steps to reopen. But analysts warned those gains could be undone in July if a ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-07-07
  • Newsletter: Covid-19 Is Reshaping the Economy
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Crude Awakening U.S. crude supply is falling at its quickest pace ever, easing a global oil glut and spurring a swift recovery in fuel prices. Yet oil’s push back above ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-07-06
  • Newsletter Special Report: Lots of Jobs, Lots of Uncertainty
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. U.S. job growth surged last month, underscoring the economy’s capacity for a quick rebound if businesses continue to reopen and consumers regain confidence. A recent coronavirus spike, however, could undermine ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-07-02
  • Newsletter: Is the Recovery Stalling?
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. It’s jobs day! We’ll have a special edition of the newsletter after the U.S. employment report is out. In the meantime, Jeff Sparshott here with the latest on the economy. ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-07-02
  • Newsletter: Wall Street vs. Main Street
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Boom! U.S. stocks wrapped up their best quarter in more than 20 years, a remarkable rally after the coronavirus pandemic brought business around the world to a virtual standstill. Just ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-07-01
  • Newsletter: Risks and Rewards
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Jobs, Jobs, Jobs The U.S. employment report out Thursday is expected to show employers added 2.9 million jobs in June, adding back a fraction of the losses from March and ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-06-30
  • Newsletter: How Will Consumers Respond to New Coronavirus Cases?
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. One Step Forward… Americans cautiously returned to the marketplace last month, helping the economy slowly dig out from a severe recession. Household spending on goods and services rose a record ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-06-29
  • Newsletter: Can Consumers Sustain a Spending Splurge?
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Spending Splurge Consumer spending likely rebounded last month. The big question now is whether the growth is sustainable. The Commerce Department is set to release its monthly report on personal income ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-06-26
  • Newsletter: New Restrictions, Unexpected Delays
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Wave Goodbye Stocks tumbled Wednesday as pockets of coronavirus infections emerged around the U.S., intensifying fears that officials would have to reinstate lockdown measures. But even without harsh restrictions, there ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-06-25
  • Newsletter: Signs of Growth, Reasons for Caution
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Essential Spending Spending by Americans with the lowest incomes has registered a far bigger bounce since the worst of the Covid-19 crisis than spending among the better off. Considering that low-income ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-06-24
  • Newsletter: Signs of Recovery
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Bounce Economic activity around the world is stabilizing. Surveys of purchasing managers showed service-sector and manufacturing output recovering in much of Europe and Asia this month, a welcome sign after ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-06-23
  • Newsletter: Raw Materials Rally Signals Quicker Recovery
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Learn to Fly Prices for raw materials including oil and copper are surging as the world economy reopens for business, a signal to many investors that global growth is returning ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-06-22
  • Fight the Virus! Please.
    One of the most confounding aspects of the pandemic has been Congress’s unwillingness or inability to spend to fight the virus. As I said in the LA Times: If an invader rained missiles down on cities across the United States killing thousands of people, we would fight back. Yet despite ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-07-11
  • Pooled Testing is Super-Beneficial
    Tyler and I have been pushing pooled testing for months. The primary benefit of pooled testing is obvious. If 1% are infected and we test 100 people individually we need 100 tests. If we split the group into five pools of twenty then if we’re lucky, we only need five ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-07-09
  • Pooled Testing is Super-Beneficial
    Tyler and I have been pushing pooled testing for months. The primary benefit of pooled testing is obvious. If 1% are infected and we test 100 people individually we need 100 tests. If we split the group into five pools of twenty then if we’re lucky, we only need five ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-07-09
  • A highly qualified reader emails me on heterogeneity
    I won’t indent further, all the rest is from the reader: “Some thoughts on your heterogeneity post. I agree this is still bafflingly under-discussed in “the discourse” & people are grasping onto policy arguments but ignoring the medical/bio aspects since ignorance of those is higher. Nobody knows the answer right ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-07-09
  • A highly qualified reader emails me on heterogeneity
    I won’t indent further, all the rest is from the reader: “Some thoughts on your heterogeneity post. I agree this is still bafflingly under-discussed in “the discourse” & people are grasping onto policy arguments but ignoring the medical/bio aspects since ignorance of those is higher. Nobody knows the answer right ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-07-09
  • Sweden fact of the day
    Cases in the Nordic country have declined sharply over the past few days and on Tuesday only 283 new cases were recorded. That contrasts with a torrid month of June when daily numbers ran as high as 1,800, eclipsing rates across much of Europe, even as deaths and hospitalisations continued ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-07-08
  • Tuesday assorted links
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-07-07
  • *False Alarm*, the new book by Bjorn Lomborg
    The subtitle is How Climate Change Panic Costs Us Trillions, Hurts the Poor, and Fails to Fix the Planet. I agree with the author’s claim that climate change is not an existential risk for humanity.  Still, both the title and subtitle bother me.  The alarm does not seem to be ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-07-07
  • *False Alarm*, the new book by Bjorn Lomborg
    The subtitle is How Climate Change Panic Costs Us Trillions, Hurts the Poor, and Fails to Fix the Planet. I agree with the author’s claim that climate change is not an existential risk for humanity.  Still, both the title and subtitle bother me.  The alarm does not seem to be ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-07-07
  • The Seen and Unseen: Rajagopalan and Tabarrok
    On my recent trip to India, just before the world went into lockdown and disarray, Shruti Rajagopalan and I visited Amit Varma’s studio in Delhi to record an episode of his podcast, The Seen and the Unseen. Our paper, Premature Imitation and India’s Flailing State served as the jumping off ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-07-06
  • The Seen and Unseen: Rajagopalan and Tabarrok
    On my recent trip to India, just before the world went into lockdown and disarray, Shruti Rajagopalan and I visited Amit Varma’s studio in Delhi to record an episode of his podcast, The Seen and the Unseen. Our paper, Premature Imitation and India’s Flailing State served as the jumping off ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-07-06
  • Signaling virtuous victimhood as indicators of Dark Triad personalities
    We investigate the consequences and predictors of emitting signals of victimhood and virtue. In our first three studies, we show that the virtuous victim signal can facilitate nonreciprocal resource transfer from others to the signaler. Next, we develop and validate a victim signaling scale that we combine with an established ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-07-06
  • Signaling virtuous victimhood as indicators of Dark Triad personalities
    We investigate the consequences and predictors of emitting signals of victimhood and virtue. In our first three studies, we show that the virtuous victim signal can facilitate nonreciprocal resource transfer from others to the signaler. Next, we develop and validate a victim signaling scale that we combine with an established ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-07-06
  • The NBA’s reopening is a warning sign
    There’s only one problem: An increasing number of players do not seem very interested in being guinea pigs in this experiment. At first the secessions were a trickle. Now they are picking up steam. Davis Bertrans, arguably the second-best active player on my home team the Washington Wizards, will not ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-07-04
  • The NBA’s reopening is a warning sign
    There’s only one problem: An increasing number of players do not seem very interested in being guinea pigs in this experiment. At first the secessions were a trickle. Now they are picking up steam. Davis Bertrans, arguably the second-best active player on my home team the Washington Wizards, will not ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2020-07-04
  • Medicare and Financial Health across the United States
    Paul Goldsmith-Pinkham, Maxim Pinkovskiy, and Jacob Wallace Consumer financial strain varies enormously across the United States. One pernicious source of financial strain is debt in collections—debt that is more than 120 days past due and that has been sold to a collections agency. In Massachusetts, the average person ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-07-08
  • Do College Tuition Subsidies Boost Spending and Reduce Debt? Impacts by Income and Race
    Rajashri Chakrabarti, William Nober, and Wilbert van der Klaauw In an October post, we showed the effect of college tuition subsidies in the form of merit-based financial aid on educational and student debt outcomes, documenting a large decline in student debt for those eligible for merit aid. Additionally, ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-07-08
  • Measuring Racial Disparities in Higher Education and Student Debt Outcomes
    Rajashri Chakrabarti, William Nober, and Wilbert van der Klaauw Across the United States, the cost of all types of higher education has been rising faster than overall inflation for more than two decades. Despite rising costs, aggregate undergraduate enrollment rose steadily between 2000 and 2010 before leveling off ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-07-08
  • Who Has Been Evicted and Why?
    Andrew Haughwout, Haoyang Liu, and Xiaohan Zhang More than two million American households are at risk of eviction every year. Evictions have been found to cause prolonged homelessness, worsened health conditions, and lack of credit access. During the COVID-19 outbreak, governments at all levels implemented eviction moratoriums to ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-07-08
  • Inequality in U.S. Homeownership Rates by Race and Ethnicity
    Andrew Haughwout, Donghoon Lee, Joelle Scally, and Wilbert van der Klaauw Homeownership has historically been an important means for Americans to accumulate wealth—in fact, at more than $15 trillion, housing equity accounts for 16 percent of total U.S. household wealth. Consequently, the U.S. homeownership cycle has triggered large swings in ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-07-08
  • Introduction to Heterogeneity Series III: Credit Market Outcomes
    Rajashri Chakrabarti Average economic outcomes serve as important indicators of the overall state of the economy. However, they mask a lot of underlying variability in how people experience the economy across geography, or by race, income, age, or other attributes. Following our series on heterogeneity broadly in October ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-07-07
  • A New Reserves Regime? COVID-19 and the Federal Reserve Balance Sheet
    Gara Afonso, Marco Cipriani, Gabriele La Spada, and Will Riordan Aggregate reserves declined from nearly $3 trillion in August 2014 to $1.4 trillion in mid-September 2019, as the Federal Reserve normalized its balance sheet. This decline came to a halt in September 2019 when the Federal Reserve responded to turmoil ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-07-07
  • How Liquid Is the New 20-Year Treasury Bond?
    Michael Fleming and Francisco Ruela On May 20, the U.S. Department of the Treasury sold a 20-year bond for the first time since 1986. In announcing the reintroduction, Treasury said it would issue the bond in a regular and predictable manner and in benchmark size, thereby creating an ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-07-01
  • Leverage Ratio Arbitrage All Over Again
    Donald P. Morgan, Dong Beom Choi, and Michael R. Holcomb Leverage limits as a form of capital regulation have a well-known, potential bug: If banks can’t lever returns as desired, they can boost returns on equity by shifting toward riskier, higher yielding assets. That reach for yield is the ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-06-30
  • Municipal Debt Markets and the COVID-19 Pandemic
    Marco Cipriani, Andrew Haughwout, Ben Hyman, Anna Kovner, Gabriele La Spada, Matthew Lieber, and Shawn Nee In March, with the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, the market for municipal securities was severely stressed: mutual fund redemptions sparked unprecedented selling of municipal securities, yields increased sharply, ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-06-29
  • Insider Networks
    Selman Erol and Michael Lee Modern-day financial systems are highly complex, with billions of exchanges in information, assets, and funds between individuals and institutions. Though daunting to operationalize, regulating these transmissions may be desirable in some instances. For example, securities regulators aim to protect investors by tracking and ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-06-25
  • Japan’s Experience with Yield Curve Control
    Matthew Higgins and Thomas Klitgaard In September 2016, the Bank of Japan (BoJ) changed its policy framework to target the yield on ten-year government bonds at “around zero percent,” close to the prevailing rate at the time. The new framework was announced as a modification of the Bank's ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-06-22
  • The New York Fed DSGE Model Forecast—June 2020
    William Chen, Marco Del Negro, Ethan Matlin, and Reca Sarfati Editor’s note: The release of the March 2020 DSGE forecast was postponed as New York Fed economists shifted their focus to the COVID-19 pandemic. In conjunction with the release of the June 2020 forecast, we’ve decided to post the March ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-06-19
  • The New York Fed DSGE Model Forecast—March 2020
    Ozge Akinci, William Chen, Marco Del Negro, Ethan Matlin, and Reca Sarfati Editor’s note: The release of the March 2020 DSGE forecast was postponed as New York Fed economists shifted their focus to the COVID-19 pandemic. With the June 2020 forecast now out, we’ve decided to post this forecast for the ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-06-19
  • Bitcoin Is Not a New Type of Money
    Michael Lee and Antoine Martin Bitcoin, and more generally, cryptocurrencies, are often described as a new type of money. In this post, we argue that this is a misconception. Bitcoin may be money, but it is not a new type of money. To see what is ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2020-06-18