Economy Feed

Filtered Keywords: Treasury, Tax, GDP, Economy, Economic, Market, Trade

Feed Sources: CNBC, Wall St. Journal , Financial Times, Marginal Revolution, Liberty Street Economics

  • JPMorgan says rising bond yields are ‘healthy signs’ and may benefit Asia
    JPMorgan Private Bank's Julia Wang says rising bond yields as well as some inflation at this point in the economic cycle are "healthy signs." ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2021-02-24
  • Cathie Wood’s funds take big morning hit before rebounding as the tech trade stumbles
    Shortly after the open, her Ark Innovation Fund was down 11%. By 10 a.m. ET, it had already traded more than 8 million shares.. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2021-02-23
  • Dow reverses a 360-point loss and ends day higher after Powell eases inflation fears
    The intraday turnaround came after Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said inflation is still "soft" and the economic outlook is still "highly uncertain." ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2021-02-23
  • Mainland Chinese markets mixed after Lunar New Year holiday; Asia-Pacific markets decline
    Investors watched mainland Chinese markets, which returned to trade Thursday following the long Lunar New Year holiday. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2021-02-17
  • Indra Nooyi: No economy can succeed without tapping the ‘incredible potential of women’
    Former PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi sees the coming years as an inflection point for women in society and says companies and countries should get behind the change. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2021-02-17
  • Fed officials see economy ‘far from’ where it needs to be, meaning easy policy won’t change soon, minutes show
    The Federal Open Market Committee on Wednesday released minutes from its Jan. 26-27 policy meeting. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2021-02-17
  • Maersk says it will launch a carbon neutral vessel by 2023, seven years ahead of schedule
    The environmental footprint of shipping, a crucial cog in the global economy, is significant. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2021-02-17
  • ‘This is not inflation’: Economist says expectations are unanchored from reality
    Inflation expectations are detaching from reality, meaning markets might be overplaying the rise in U.S. Treasury yields, says Carl Weinberg, chief economist at High Frequency Economics. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2021-02-17
  • Here’s how to play the Singapore markets as the government announces new budget plans
    Companies exposed to the aviation and retail sectors would benefit from Singapore's new spending plans, said analysts from DBS. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2021-02-17
  • Stimulus prospects could boost the stock market and interest rates in the week ahead
    The prospects of a big government spending program could continue to boost the stock market and put upward pressure on interest rates in the week ahead. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2021-02-12
  • UK suffers worst annual economic slump since the Great Frost of 1709, a 9.9% decline
    The U.K. economy experienced its largest contraction since records began in 2020, as the coronavirus pandemic ravaged Britain's economic activity. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2021-02-12
  • Biden warns China is going to ‘eat our lunch’ if U.S. doesn’t get moving on infrastructure
    The telephone call between Xi and Biden comes as the new U.S. administration works to mend trade relations with the world's second-largest economy. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2021-02-11
  • Herd trading is causing some investors to be ‘forced out of business almost,’ Citi says
    A recent shift toward momentum trading in certain assets could see value-driven investors nearly "forced out of business," according to Citi Global Markets Strategist Matt King. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2021-02-11
  • CEO of Singapore’s largest bank says it sees ‘signs of strength’ in most of its markets
    Some Asian countries have bounced back from the economic pain of Covid-19 and that bodes well for the 2021 outlook, according to Piyush Gupta, CEO of DBS. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2021-02-10
  • Vietnam grew faster than China last year and UBS says its economy still has ‘huge potential’
    The Vietnam economy's growth is "outstripping" the rest of its frontier market peers, says UBS Global Wealth Management's Kelvin Tay. ... read more
    Source: Econ – CNBC 1Published on 2021-02-10
  • Have We All Lost Our Ability to Compromise? (NSQ Ep.40)
    Also: is it better to be right or “not wrong”? *      *      * Relevant Research & References Here’s where you can learn more about the people and ideas in this episode: SOURCES Christopher Peterson, late professor of psychology at the University of Michigan. Lee Ross, ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2021-02-21
  • Jeff Immelt Knows He Let You Down (Ep. 452)
    Not so long ago, G.E. was the most valuable company in the world, a conglomerate that included everything from light bulbs and jet engines to financial services and The Apprentice. Now it’s selling off body parts to survive. What does the C.E.O. who presided over the decline have to ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2021-02-17
  • Is Everybody Cheating These Days? (NSQ Ep. 39)
    Also, what’s better: to learn new skills or go deep on what you’re good at? *      *      * Relevant Research & References Here’s where you can learn more about the people and ideas in this episode: SOURCES W.C. Fields, actor and writer. Dan Ariely, behavioral ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2021-02-14
  • Can I Ask You a Ridiculously Personal Question? (Ep. 451)
    Most of us are are afraid to ask sensitive questions about money, sex, politics, etc. New research shows this fear is largely unfounded. Time for some interesting conversations! Listen and subscribe to our podcast at Apple PodcastsStitcher, or elsewhere. Below is a transcript of the episode, edited for readability. For more ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2021-02-10
  • What Does It Mean to Be a “Good” Man? (NSQ Ep. 38)
    Also: how can you stop ruminating? *      *      * Relevant Research & References Here’s where you can learn more about the people and ideas in this episode: SOURCES Elizabeth Nyamayaro, former senior advisor to Under-Secretary-General and Executive Director for UN Women. Susan Nolen-Hoeksema, founding editor, ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2021-02-07
  • How to Be Better at Death (Ep. 450)
    Caitlin Doughty is a mortician who would like to put herself out of business. Our corporate funeral industry, she argues, has made us forget how to offer our loved ones an authentic sendoff. Doughty is the author of Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons From the Crematory. ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2021-02-03
  • How Do You Know if People Don’t Like You? (NSQ Ep. 37)
    Also: do self-help books really help? *      *      * Relevant Research & References Here’s where you can learn more about the people and ideas in this episode: SOURCES Samuel Smiles, Scottish writer and author of Self-Help.  E.B. White, author of Charlotte’s Web.  Charles Baudelaire, ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2021-01-31
  • How to Fix the Incentives in Cancer Research (Ep. 449)
    For all the progress made in fighting cancer, it still kills 10 million people a year, and some types remain especially hard to detect and treat. Pancreatic cancer, for instance, is nearly always fatal. A new clinical-trial platform could change that by aligning institutions that typically compete against one ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2021-01-27
  • The Downside of Disgust (Ep. 448)
    It’s a powerful biological response that has preserved our species for millennia. But now it may be keeping us from pursuing strategies that would improve the environment, the economy, even our own health. So is it time to dial down our disgust reflex? You can help fix things — ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2021-01-20
  • Does Psychotherapy Actually Work? (NSQ Ep. 35)
    Also: how many “selves” is it okay to have? *      *      * Relevant Research & References Here’s where you can learn more about the people and ideas in this episode: SOURCES Aaron Beck, psychiatrist and professor emeritus of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. Albert ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2021-01-17
  • How Much Do We Really Care About Children? (Ep. 447)
    They can’t vote or hire lobbyists. The policies we create to help them aren’t always so helpful. Consider the car seat: parents hate it, the safety data are unconvincing, and new evidence suggests an unintended consequence that is as anti-child as it gets. Listen and subscribe to our podcast ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2021-01-13
  • “We Get All Our Great Stuff from Europe — Including Witch Hunting.” (Ep. 446)
    We’ve collected some of our favorite moments from People I (Mostly) Admire, the latest show from the Freakonomics Radio Network. Host Steve Levitt seeks advice from scientists and inventors, memory wizards and basketball champions — even his fellow economists. He also asks about quitting, witch trials, and whether we need ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2021-01-06
  • Trust Me (Ep. 266 Rebroadcast)
    Societies where people trust one another are healthier and wealthier. In the U.S. (and the U.K. and elsewhere), social trust has been falling for decades — in part because our populations are more diverse. What can we do to fix it? Listen and subscribe to our podcast at Apple PodcastsStitcher, ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-12-30
  • Does Advertising Actually Work? (Part 2: Digital) (Ep. 441)
    Google and Facebook are worth a combined $2 trillion, with the vast majority of their revenue coming from advertising. In our previous episode, we learned that TV advertising is much less effective than the industry says. Is digital any better? Some say yes, some say no — and some ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-11-25
  • Does Advertising Actually Work? (Part 1: TV) (Ep. 440)
    Companies around the world spend more than half-a-trillion dollars each year on ads. The ad industry swears by its efficacy — but a massive new study tells a different story. Listen and subscribe to our podcast at Apple PodcastsStitcher, or elsewhere. Below is a transcript of the episode, edited for readability. ... read more
    Source: Econ – Freakonomics 2Published on 2020-11-18
  • Parsing the Fed: How the January Statement Changed From December
    The Federal Reserve releases a statement at the conclusion of each of its policy-setting meetings, outlining the central bank’s economic outlook and the actions it plans to take. Fed watchers closely parse changes between statements to see how the Fed’s views are evolving. This tool compares the latest statement ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2021-01-27
  • Parsing the Fed: How the December Statement Changed From November
    The Federal Reserve releases a statement at the conclusion of each of its policy-setting meetings, outlining the central bank’s economic outlook and the actions it plans to take. Fed watchers closely parse changes between statements to see how the Fed’s views are evolving. This tool compares the latest statement ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-12-16
  • Parsing the Fed: How the November Statement Changed From September
    The Federal Reserve releases a statement at the conclusion of each of its policy-setting meetings, outlining the central bank’s economic outlook and the actions it plans to take. Fed watchers closely parse changes between statements to see how the Fed’s views are evolving. This tool compares the latest statement ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-11-05
  • Parsing the Fed: How the September Statement Changed from July
    The Federal Reserve releases a statement at the conclusion of each of its policy-setting meetings, outlining the central bank’s economic outlook and the actions it plans to take. Fed watchers closely parse changes between statements to see how the Fed’s views are evolving. This tool compares the latest statement ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-09-16
  • Newsletter: Soaring Debt, Big Layoffs and a Booming Stock Market
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. From Liberty Bonds to Coronavirus Bills U.S. debt has reached its highest level compared to the size of the economy since World War II and is projected to exceed ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-09-03
  • Newsletter: More Factory Output, Fewer Factory Workers
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. More Output, Fewer Workers U.S. factory output continued to grow in August, but the picture for employment was mixed, a possible sign of lingering uncertainty about the coronavirus pandemic ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-09-02
  • Newsletter: From Furloughed to Fired
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Big Gains, Permanent Losses The U.S. employment report for August is out Friday and likely to show another month of historic labor-market gains. But the number of jobs will ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-08-31
  • Newsletter: Consumer Spending, Inflation vs. Employment and the Virus that Won’t Go Away
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. U.S. consumer spending numbers are due out this morning, the Fed makes a major shift in the way it sets interest rates and Europe is facing a big rise ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-08-28
  • Newsletter: Deep Contraction, Hurricane Hit and Millennial Power
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Long Road to Recovery The world’s rich economies experienced the deepest contraction in at least six decades in the spring, while continuing outbreaks of the novel coronavirus mean their ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-08-27
  • Newsletter: Limited Supplies, High Demand
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. House Hunters U.S. new-home sales rose to the highest level since the waning days of the housing bubble, underscoring a strong recovery for the housing market as people search ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-08-26
  • Newsletter: China Is Catching Up
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. China is closing the economic gap with the U.S., another round of Covid lockdowns would be too costly, more U.S. workers are testing positive for drugs, and Canada scores ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-08-25
  • Newsletter: Debt, Labor Divide and Live Music
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. It’s another full week for economic data and policy talk, bookended by the Republican National Convention at the start of the week and the Kansas City Fed’s annual policy ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-08-24
  • Newsletter: U.S. Labor Market Cools, U.K. Output Jumps
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Wrong Way New applications for unemployment benefits rose last week, another sign the labor market’s recovery is cooling amid continuing disruptions from the coronavirus pandemic. Weekly initial claims for ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-08-21
  • Newsletter: Layoffs, Trade Talks and the Fed’s Outlook
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. On the Mend, Slowly New applications for unemployment benefits have eased in recent weeks but remain at historically high levels, indicating that the labor market is healing but still ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-08-20
  • Newsletter: Building Boom, Stimulus Talks and a New High for Stocks
    This is the web version of the WSJ’s newsletter on the economy. You can sign up for daily delivery here. Building Boom U.S. new-home construction surged in July. Housing starts jumped 23% from June to an annual pace of almost 1.5 million, a reflection of rock-bottom interest rates and ... read more
    Source: Econ – WSJ 3Published on 2020-08-19
  • The economic geography of global warming
    By Jose Cruz Alvarez and Esteban Rossi-Hansberg: Our baseline results show welfare losses as large as 15% in parts of Africa and Latin America but also high heterogeneity across locations, with northern regions in Siberia, Canada, and Alaska experiencing gains. Our results indicate large uncertainty about average welfare ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2021-02-16
  • The conversation some of you want to have
    The most frequently upvoted request was this, noting that I will add in numbers so you may follow my replies: 1. Looking back on your history of blogging, what were you most right about? And what were you most wrong about? Are there any posts you regret? ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2021-02-16
  • The regulatory state and the passage of time
    The mere passage of time as an explanatory factor is underrated in public choice and regulatory economics, though Mancur Olson understood it well.  Here is an update on the new CDC guidelines for school reopening: For months, President Biden has been urging schools to reopen, ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2021-02-15
  • *Resetting the Table*
    The author is Robert Paarlberg and the subtitle is Straight Talk About the Food We Grow and Eat.  This book is a refreshing change of pace from most of the other food books, which tend to be illiterate on the economic side.  Here is one excerpt: Modern farming ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2021-02-15
  • Sunday assorted links
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2021-02-14
  • Diversity and Inclusion in Economics
    We congratulate the Department of Economics at the University of Missouri-Columbia for winning the AEA’s inaugural Award for Outstanding Achievement in Diversity and Inclusion. Eric Parson’s, one of the leaders of the initiative, credits our textbook, Modern Principles of Economics, with providing the springboard for fruitful discussions and ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2021-02-12
  • How much do we value Covid safety?
    The grand experiment of blocking the middle seat on airplanes has proved what we have known all along about air travel: More people care about a cheap fare than comfort, or even pandemic safety. Delta announced on Monday that it was extending its middle-seat block for one ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2021-02-12
  • Sentences to ponder
    Nearly 60 percent of the people facing charges related to the Capitol riot showed signs of prior money troubles, including bankruptcies, notices of eviction or foreclosure, bad debts, or unpaid taxes over the past two decades, according to a Washington Post analysis of public records for 125 ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2021-02-11
  • Full employment and the output gap
    I’ve never accepted the standard story about “being at full employment” vs. “having unemployed resources” around, though often I write in that framework for reasons of intelligibility.  That said, I do not reject this story in ways that make current debate participants very happy, or would create the ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2021-02-11
  • Canada Needs a New Vaccination Strategy
    The US vaccination rollout has been deadly slow, inefficient, and chaotic. It has also been one of the best in the world. Canada, for example, is far behind the US on vaccination. The Canadian deficit is mostly because they don’t have enough vaccine. Canada bought doses but ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2021-02-10
  • Tuesday assorted links
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2021-02-09
  • Decentralized Finance and Innovation
    Decentralized finance to date seems mostly to be about speculatively trading one cryptocurrency for another. I see little real investment. But in my post on Elrond, I also wrote, “The DeX’s or decentralized exchanges have shown that automated market makers can perform the services of market order books ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2021-02-09
  • Who first noticed the tech was ready for human genome sequencing? (that was then, this is now)
    Perkin Elmer’s last purchase had been a Cambridge, Massachusetts, company called PerSeptive Biosystems, a protein-analysis enterprise started by Lebanese-born wunderkind Noubar Afeyan seven years earlier, when the ink was still wet on his Ph.D. from MIT. Afeyan had sold his company to Perkin Elmer for almost $400 ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2021-02-09
  • Stimulus sentences to ponder
    Estimates by Harvard economics professor Raj Chetty and his colleagues suggest that consumer spending by low-income consumers is up more than 13 percent from January 2020 to January 2021, before any new stimulus. Researchers working with data from the JPMorgan Chase Institute find household cash balances have risen across the income distribution ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2021-02-07
  • Larry Summers, Right Again
    No surprise but in can case you were wondering, retail investors trade mostly on noise. A little bit more surprising is that the effect is to make markets less liquid since some models suggest that noise traders make markets more liquid and accurate by bringing in the sharks. ... read more
    Source: Econ Marginal Revolution 4Published on 2021-02-07
  • State-of-the-Field Conference on Cyber Risk to Financial Stability
    The Federal Reserve Bank of New York partnered with Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) for the second annual State-of-the-Field Conference on Cyber Risk to Financial Stability on December 14-15, 2020. Hosted virtually ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2021-02-24
  • Measuring the Forest through the Trees: The Corporate Bond Market Distress Index
    With more than $10.4 trillion outstanding as of Q3:2020, the U.S. corporate bond market is a significant source of funding for most large U.S. corporations. While prior literature offers a variety of measures to capture different aspects ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2021-02-22
  • How Competitive are U.S. Treasury Repo Markets?
    The Treasury repo market is at the center of the U.S. financial system, serving as a source of secured funding as well as providing liquidity for Treasuries in the secondary market. ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2021-02-18
  • Mortgage Rates Decline and (Prime) Households Take Advantage
    Today, the New York Fed’s Center for Microeconomic Data reported that household debt balances increased by $206 billion in the fourth quarter of 2020, marking a $414 billion increase since the end of ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2021-02-17
  • February Regional Business Surveys Find Widespread Supply Disruptions
    Business activity increased in the region’s manufacturing sector in recent weeks but continued to decline in the region’s service sector, continuing a divergent trend seen over the past several months, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s February regional ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2021-02-17
  • Did Subsidies to Too-Big-To-Fail Banks Increase during the COVID-19 Pandemic?
    Once a bank grows beyond a certain size or becomes too complex and interconnected, investors often perceive that it is “too big to fail” (TBTF), meaning that if the bank were to become distressed, the government would likely bail it out. In a recent ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2021-02-11
  • Black and White Differences in the Labor Market Recovery from COVID-19
    The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and the various measures put in place to contain it caused a rapid deterioration in labor market conditions for many workers and plunged the nation into recession. The unemployment rate increased ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2021-02-09
  • Understanding the Racial and Income Gap in Commuting for Work Following COVID-19
    The introduction of numerous social distancing policies across the United States, combined with voluntary pullbacks in activity as responses to the COVID-19 outbreak, resulted in differences emerging in the types of work that were done from home and those ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2021-02-09
  • Some Workers Have Been Hit Much Harder than Others by the Pandemic
    As the COVID-19 pandemic took hold in the United States, in just two months—between February and April 2020—the nation saw well over 20 million workers lose their jobs, an unprecedented 15 percent decline. Since then, substantial progress has been made, ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2021-02-09
  • Up on Main Street
    The Main Street Lending Program was the last of the facilities launched by the Fed and Treasury to support the flow of credit during the COVID-19 pandemic. The others primarily targeted Wall Street borrowers; Main Street was for smaller firms ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2021-02-05
  • Equity Volatility Term Premia
    Investors can buy volatility hedges on the stock market using variance swaps or VIX futures. One motivation for hedging volatility is its negative relationship with the stock market. When volatility increases, stock returns tend to decline contemporaneously, a result known as ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2021-02-03
  • The Law of One Price in Equity Volatility Markets
    Can option traders take a square root? Surprisingly, maybe not. This post shows that VIX futures prices exhibit significant deviations from their option-implied upper bounds—the square root of variance swap forward rates—thus violating the law of one price, a fundamental concept ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2021-02-01
  • Job Seekers’ Beliefs and the Causes of Long-Term Unemployment
    In addition to its terrible human toll, the COVID-19 pandemic has also caused massive disruption in labor markets. In the United States alone, more than 25 million people lost their jobs during the first wave of the pandemic. ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2021-01-29
  • Discretionary and Nondiscretionary Services Expenditures during the COVID-19 Recession
    The coronavirus pandemic and the various measures to address it have led to unprecedented convulsions to the U.S. and global economies. In this post, I examine those extraordinary impacts through the lens of personal consumption expenditures on discretionary and nondiscretionary services, a framework I ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2021-01-15
  • Understanding the Racial and Income Gap in COVID-19: Essential Workers
    This is the fourth and final post in this series aimed at understanding the gap in COVID-19 intensity by race and by income. The previous three posts focused on the role of mediating variables—such as uninsurance rates, comorbidities, and ... read more
    Source: Econ Liberty Street 5Published on 2021-01-12